I need books on emerging blogging nomadic couch surfing apostles

I need books on emerging blogging nomadic couch surfing apostles

I need you to recommend some books for me. The creative people at Cornerstone Festival have taken my three seminars and given them a single title. THANKS! I have asked them to change the “emergent” word, which I try to avoid, but that’s fine if they want to use it. Here’s how the seminar looks on their website:

Emergent Blogging Nomadic Couch Surfing Apostles
Andrew Jones (3 Sessions)

The Tall Skinny Kiwi offers a travelogue of places and people on the road into the 21st century. First, an account of one man’s journey through Emergentdom, its rise, controversies, and what remains after the movement finally shaves off its goatee and gets a real job. Second, a survey of Christian blogging and look ahead down the online stream. Third, a look at existential migration as an alternative to short term missions — how to survive, and how to make an impact.

Heres the deal. For Northern Seminary to offer credit for the courses they sanction at Cornerstone,  I need to recommend some books in each of the three areas. Can you help me?

The three sessions needing books for students to read before they come, and the books you can possibly point me to, are:

1. The global emerging church. I want to trace the movement over the last 25 years as it has grown on each continent. Most books only deal with USA and sometimes UK. Very few, if any, deal with Asia, Latin America and Africa. I suggested The New Conspirators by Tom Sine because it deals with plenty of countries (although mostly Western) and include the new monastic movement which is important in my opinion.

2. Social media and Christian ministry. My talk will be an overview of the first decade of Christian blogging, how social media has changed the way we do ministry today and the future of life-streaming online, publishing on tablets and the shift from web site to app. Any books on this????

3. Mission among the next generation. What global missions is looking like today with young couch surfers, new monastics, global nomads and missional pilgrims carving out a new and more sustainable way of changing the world on a budget through Kingdom oriented social enterprise. I can think of a lot of real life examples but I am pulling out my hair trying to think of a single book on this subject.

Somebody help me.

About The Author

Andrew Jones

186 Comments

  • cathryn Thomas on May 26, 2011

    Sounds like you might want to keep your hair on your head and just go ahead and write the friggin book dear! Long over due. xocat

  • steve on May 27, 2011

    out of bounds church has stories from NZ, Australia, UK and USA,
    Ryan Bolger is editing a book on Global fresh expressions,
    steve

  • Chelle on May 27, 2011

    Hey Andrew,
    I started a blog this year to track my personal journey through reading in this area. I can make the following suggestions (and you can look at my blog http://reddresstheology.wordpress.com)
    Emerging Church in Australia:
    Emerging Down Under by Ray Simpson & Brent Lyons-Lee
    God’s Next Big Thing by Scott Cowdell (Australian Angl-Catholic Anglican Theologian – more theology than anything else but actually really great)
    I can confirm that my searches have not uncovered any details about spread of the movement in Asia either, though haven’t made it through the Frost and Hirsh stuff. The NZ stuff you will know.
    More general spirituality in Australia research:
    Christian Research Association, Shaping Australia’s Spirituality.
    Australian Soul by Gary Bouma
    Mark McCrindle has whole heap of Gen XYZ research http://theabcofxyz.com.au/ABCXYZ/index.html
    Again, dearth of information on emergent movment as far as I can tell, which tells us something in and of itself.
    I’ll be keeping an eye on whether anyone else comes up with more! Good luck.
    Chelle

  • Chelle on May 27, 2011

    Feel the need to qualify… my blog is about theology rather than emergent movement per se.

  • Andrew on May 27, 2011

    thanks.
    any more?

  • Matt Stone on May 27, 2011

    The books suggested for Australia so far are all comparatively late. I’d suggest some earlier ones be scattered in like: Christianarchy by Dave Andrews (1999), Jesus and the Gods of the New Age by Ross Clifford and Phil Johnson (2001), Jesus the Fool by Mike Frost (1994) and read up on the innovative work by Robert Banks in the 90s and John Smith back in the late 60s.

  • R on May 28, 2011

    Sean Feucht of the Burn 24-7 (http://burn24-7.com/) has incredible insight. I recommend his book, “Fire and Fragrance: From the Great Commandment to the Great Commission,” for your ‘mission among the next generation’ segment.
    He is a humble pioneer.
    Note: When I hit ‘preview’ in making this post, it erased my writing.

  • Herman on May 29, 2011

    The one problem I have with your questions:
    I know a lot of local books about holland / europe, but: they’re all in Dutch.
    There’s one in English I can recommend to you from Samuel Lee. He’s a migrant pastor here in Amsterdam and is doing terrific work among refugees. He instituted a free university to enable refugees to get education.
    He recently held a workshop with Brian McLaren, who has been a great influence in his theological thinking. The core message of his book “A new kind of pentecostalism” is let us become more humble and become servants to the needy and activists for freedom. The world is full of refugees and needy and the core of our christianity is to reach out. I feel he lives his message out in what is doing, by which he underscores his message.
    His blog (samlee) article “Reforming Pentecostalism” on his blog is a good introduction to the book. The core message is simple, but very relevant. The article sums it up this way:
    Lastly, the relevant church should never stop hoping, dreaming and fighting for justice and righteousness in the Name of Jesus in a world where love will always have the last word and not the differences that so divide and rule us. It’s about time to grow up. It’s time to be relevant! It’s time for reforming the Pentecostalism.
    I think Samuel and his book would best fit into the category missional pilgrims carving out a new and more sustainable way of changing the world on a budget through Kingdom oriented social enterprise. Especially with regard to the model of free education for migrants.

  • Herman on May 29, 2011

    The one problem I have with your questions:
    I know a lot of local books about holland / europe, but: they’re all in Dutch.
    There’s one in English I can recommend to you from Samuel Lee. He’s a migrant pastor here in Amsterdam and is doing terrific work among refugees. He instituted a free university to enable refugees to get education.
    He recently held a workshop with Brian McLaren, who has been a great influence in his theological thinking. The core message of his book “A new kind of pentecostalism” is; let us become more humble and become servants to the needy and activists for freedom. The world is full of refugees and needy, and the core of our christianity is to reach out. I feel he lives his message out in what is doing, by which he underscores his message.
    His blog (samlee.org) article “Reforming Pentecostalism” is a good introduction to the book. The core message is simple, but very relevant. The article sums it up this way:
    Lastly, the relevant church should never stop hoping, dreaming and fighting for justice and righteousness in the Name of Jesus in a world where love will always have the last word and not the differences that so divide and rule us. It’s about time to grow up. It’s time to be relevant! It’s time for reforming the Pentecostalism.
    I think Samuel and his book would best fit into the category missional pilgrims carving out a new and more sustainable way of changing the world on a budget through Kingdom oriented social enterprise. Especially with regard to the model of free education for migrants.

  • Andrew on May 30, 2011

    thanks. i will look into samuel lee. you might be interested to read of the emerging church meeting we had in amsterdam. http://tallskinnykiwi.typepad.com/tallskinnykiwi/2008/01/amsterdam.html

  • brambonius on May 31, 2011

    Samuel Lee is an interesting guy. He also wrote a very interesting book about the history of Christianity in Japan (in English) that I can recommend. I’ve met him last summer on the flevo festival in Holland, very nice guy. He’s originally from Iran, a sociologist or soemthing like thatn, some kind of an ’emerging pentecostel’ guy, and the one who has been bringing Shane Claiborne and Brian McLaren to holland to speak on occasions…

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